Learn how example students at the College of Mount St. Joseph made earning a degree affordable with financial aid.

There are several things you should consider when evaluating college costs:

  • Time-to-degree
  • Financial aid options
  • Out-of-pocket expenses
  • Available tax credits

The total cost of your education includes:

  • Tuition
  • Room and board
  • Books
  • Fees
  • Transportation
  • Personal expenses

Families are unique and so are their financial needs. These four case studies portray different scenarios of financial need and total aid packages.

Case Study: Julie

Julie lives close to the Mount and has decided she would like to continue living at home while in college. She is from a family of four, whose parents have a combined income of $60,000 and very little savings. 

  Per Year
Tuition and fees $25,800
Books and other expenses $4,000
Total commuter student budget $29,800
Expected family contribution -$5,200
Total financial need $24,600
Based on her academic record and her financial need, Julie received the following aid package:
Elizabeth Seton Scholarship and Mount Grant $17,000
Federal Student Loans $6,100
College Work Study $1,500
Total Aid $24,600

Case Study: Michael

Michael works a part-time job at his neighborhood library, so he plans to commute. His parents are both retired.

  Per Year
Tuition and fees $25,800
Books and other expenses $4,000
Total commuter student budget $29,800
Expected family contribution -$2,500
Total financial need $27,300
Based on his academic record and his financial need, Michael received the following aid package:
Mount Opportunity Award and Mount Grant $9,500
Federal and State Grants $3,095
Loans $6,500
College Work Study $1,500
Total Aid $20,595

Case Study: Adam

Adam lives about three hours from the Mount so living in the residence hall is a must. His parents both work outside the home, earning a total income of $175,000. They have savings of $30,000.

  Per Year
Tuition and fees $25,800
Room and Board $8,080
Books and other expenses $2,000
Total resident student budget $33,832
Expected family contribution -$35,880
Total financial need $0
Because Adam’s expected family contribution exceeds his cost of attendance, he won't receive need-based aid. However, he will receive the following aid:
Merit Award $10,000
Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan $5,500
Total Aid $15,500

Case Study: Katie

Katie would like to live on campus. She has several brothers and sisters. Her father died several years ago, and her mother has to support the family with her earnings and the Social Security benefits the family receives. Katie has a minimum wage, part-time job that helps her cover her own incidental expenses.

  Per Year
Tuition and fees $25,800
Room and Board $8,080
Books and other expenses $2,000
Total resident student budget $35,880
Expected family contribution $0
Total financial need $35,880
Based on her academic record and her financial need, Katie received the following aid package:
Trustee Scholarship and Mount Grant $15,500
Federal and State Grants $7,925
Federal Student Loans $6,500
College Work Study $1,500
Total Aid $31,425